Sam Wolfe Connelly
"There is no final, satisfying way to balance our need to be known with our need to be alone. The balance is always uncertain and provisional; it’s always a matter of dissatisfaction, give-and-take, and sacrifice…It’s up to each of us to balance the risks and rewards—to trade, in right proportion, loneliness for freedom, explicability for mystery, and the knowable for the unknown within ourselves."

— Joshua Rothman, “Virginia Woolf’s Idea of Privacy” (via larmoyante)

saatchiart:

Artist of the Day | Amy Bernays See more works

saatchiart:

Artist of the Day | Amy Bernays
See more works

"I was very fond of you, but now I’m so, so tired. I’m not happy to go, but one needn’t be happy to make another start."

— Albert Camus, The Plague  (via goghst)

(Source: hellanne, via lyriquediscorde)

"Whenever you are about to find fault with someone, ask yourself the following question: What fault of mine most nearly resembles the one I am about to criticize?"

— Marcus Aurelius (via thecalminside)

(via jayalice)

explore-blog:

Jeanette Winterson on reading, time, and how art creates a sanctified space for the human experience – spectacular 1994 interview. 
stormtrooperfashion:

Magda Laguinge in “Sidewalk Stories” by David Bellemere for ELLE, August 2014

stormtrooperfashion:

Magda Laguinge in “Sidewalk Stories” by David Bellemere for ELLE, August 2014

"There are questions that you don’t ask because you’re afraid of the answers to them."

— Agatha Christie, The Moving Finger (via larmoyante)

"Falling in love with yourself first doesn’t make you vain or selfish, it makes you indestructible."

— Things I’ll teach my children  (via whitenes-s)

(Source: infl4ted, via jayalice)

"This is what you shall do; Love the earth and sun and the animals, despise riches, give alms to every one that asks, stand up for the stupid and crazy, devote your income and labor to others, hate tyrants, argue not concerning God, have patience and indulgence toward the people, take off your hat to nothing known or unknown or to any man or number of men, go freely with powerful uneducated persons and with the young and with the mothers of families, read these leaves in the open air every season of every year of your life, re-examine all you have been told at school or church or in any book, dismiss whatever insults your own soul, and your very flesh shall be a great poem and have the richest fluency not only in its words but in the silent lines of its lips and face and between the lashes of your eyes and in every motion and joint of your body."

— Walt Whitman (via optimistsdaughter)

(via optimistsdaughter)